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Number of Projects: 317

Hidden Harvest – Pick, Share, and Take Good Care

Hidden Harvest - Pick, Share, and Take Good Care

(Theme 5 – Food)

Organization: Hidden Harvest Ottawa

Timeline for Completion: Founded 2012 – Ongoing

Objective:

Reveal, harvest and share the fruit and nuts around Ottawa.

Through volunteer-led harvests, educational programs, and partnerships, we seek to make good use of local food and inspire community members to steward the bounty growing in their neighbourhood.

There is local food that could be put to good use.

More information…


Fall Colours Hike – Blueberry Mountain

Fall Colours Hike - Blueberry Mountain

(Theme 8 – Health, Theme 9 – Recreation)

Organization: Mississippi Madawaska Land Trust (MMLT)

Timeline for Completion: Annual Event in Fall

Objective:

Is there a more spectacular way to take in the fall colours than from the top of Blueberry Mountain – one of the seven wonders of Lanark County? Not in our minds…

Each year the MMLT offers its annual Fall Colours Nature Walk at this lovely 1250-acre wilderness property known as cliffLAND. The Clifford Family entered into a conservation easement agreement with the Land Trust in 2009 to permanently preserve this wilderness area which had already become a haven for tourists.

Date: October 6, 2019, 10:00 am to 2 pm
Location: 502 Hills of Peace Rd, Flower Station, Ont.

More information…


Ottawa River paddle and hike up the sacred cliff known as Oiseau Rock

Ottawa River paddle and hike up the sacred cliff known as Oiseau Rock

(Theme 4 – Habitat, Theme 6 – Natural Capital)

Organization: The Ottawa River Institute and Ottawa Riverkeeper

Timeline for Completion: Saturday September 7 ~ 9:30 am (from Sheenboro Quebec)

Objective:

This is a wonderful opportunity to see a beautiful part of the Ottawa River and have a guided tour of Oiseau Rock, sacred rock art site of the Anishinabek Algonquin People.

There is a beautiful view from on top of the cliff of the Ottawa River and environs. We will be paddling with our friends from Ottawa Riverkeeper and the Bonnechere River Watershed Project.

Our guide, Joann McCann has invited us to launch our kayaks and canoes from her home near Sheenboro Quebec. From there it is a 5 kilometre paddle to the base of the cliff and about a 20 minute hike to the top. Please bring your canoe or kayak, safety gear and a lunch.

More information…


Reptile and Amphibian Recovery and Education (R.A.R.E)

Reptile and Amphibian Recovery and Education (R.A.R.E)

(Theme 4 – Habitat)

Organization: Thousand Islands National Park in Mallorytown

Timeline for Completion: Ongoing

Objective:

Thousand Islands National Park is home to a unique mixture of reptile and amphibian species, ten of which are at risk. To ensure these amazing species will survive for generations to come, the park has created the R.A.R.E. project. This project involves two key components: species recovery and public education.

About 80 turtle hatchlings incubated at the Thousand Islands National Park in Mallorytown were released Thursday (Aug 29) with kids from a nearby nature camp enlisted to help.

This spring, National Park staff carefully collected nearly 250 eggs and put them into an incubator. Over the past few months, several of the turtles have hatched and were ready to be released into the wild this week.

“Projects like this that really engage the public and get them involved with protecting turtles on their own land and helping turtles in other ways is super important not only to protect turtle populations in the park but also through all of Ontario” said park ecologist Josh Van Wieren.

The initiative is part of the reptile and amphibian recovery and education (R.A.R.E) project that has a goal of protecting the turtle population while also educating the public. Other eggs continue to hatch and will also be released.

More information…


Combined Sewage Storage Tunnel (CSST) – City of Ottawa

Combined Sewage Storage Tunnel (CSST) – City of Ottawa

(Theme 6 – Natural Capital, Theme 8 – Health)

Organization: City of Ottawa

Timeline for Completion: Start 2016 and Operational in fall 2020

Objective:

The Combined Sewage Storage Tunnel (CSST) is one of the most important projects of the Ottawa River Action Plan (ORAP), which is the City of Ottawa’s roadmap to protect the Ottawa River for future generations.

The CSST will greatly reduce the frequency of sewage overflows during storms from entering the Ottawa River, and will help protect the river. These tunnels will hold up to 43,000m3 of sewer overflow during major rainfalls, the equivalent capacity of approximately 18 Olympic sized pools. Once rainfall has subsided, this water will then be treated and returned safely to the Ottawa River.

The CSST project is a $232.3 million investment and part of the Ottawa River Action Plan. Funding is being provided by the Government of Canada, the Government of Ontario, and the City of Ottawa. The Government of Canada and Province of Ontario are each providing $62.09 million. In addition, the City has committed $108 million.

The CSST is about 85-percent complete, with a rollout date of fall 2020.

More information…


Carlington Bike Park – Complements existing urban green spaces

Carlington Bike Park - Complements existing urban green spaces

(Theme 8 – Health, Theme 9 – Recreation)

Organization: Ottawa Mountain Bike Association (OMBA) and City of Ottawa

Timeline for Completion: Sept 2019

Objective:

The Ottawa Mountain Bike Association with the support of the Carlington Community, have partnered with the City of Ottawa to build a bike park in Carlington Park . The former site of Carlington ski hill provides the ideal open space and natural terrain for the location of a bike park within the city’s urban core. It is an open space where parents can easily watch their kids as they have fun riding!! This is an ideal environment for physical activity for all fitness levels.

More information…


Pick-Your-Own Farm / Roadside Market – Orleans Fruit Farm

Pick-Your-Own Farm / Roadside Market - Orleans Fruit Farm

(Theme 5 – Food, Theme 8 – Health)

Organization: Orleans Fruit Farm / La Ferme d’Orléans

Timeline for Completion: Ongoing Seasonal

Objective:

Fruits and vegetables grower for the local market. We have quite a variety of produce picked daily by our team in the morning. Open daily 10am to 6pm (weekdays) and 9am to 5pm (weekends).
Location:
1399 St Joseph Blvd,
Orleans, Ontario

More information…


2019 Fall GLAD Cleaning the Capital

2019 Fall GLAD Cleaning the Capital

(Theme 7 – Waste)

Organization: City of Ottawa

Timeline for Completion: Annual Event – Spring & Fall

Objective:

The GLAD Cleaning the Capital campaign is a citywide cleanup that occurs in the spring and fall of every year. Residents come together as a community and combine efforts to make our city clean and green. Litter pickup or graffiti removal projects must be registered, and participating teams, upon request, receive a cleanup starter kit to assist them with their projects. Participants who register their cleanups during the campaign’s early bird registration period and/or submit their on-line cleanup reports after their cleanup are eligible to win prizes donated by the campaign’s generous sponsors.

2019 marks the 26th year of the GLAD Cleaning the Capital campaign! The annual cleanup campaign first began in 1994 as a springtime cleanup. In 2006, due to the spring campaign’s overwhelming success an annual fall cleanup was added. Since 1994, more than one million volunteers have participated in more than 20,000 cleanup projects throughout the city. As a result, an estimated 1,000,000 kilograms of waste has been removed from our public spaces.

The GLAD Cleaning the Capital campaign is not-for-profit initiative and relies heavily on the generosity of sponsors who offer financial and in-kind support. Cleaning the Capital is an exciting way for residents to foster community pride by cleaning up their parks, bus stops, woodlots, ravines, shorelines and pathways, while enjoying the outdoors and ensuring that Ottawa stays clean, green, and graffiti and litter-free.

Register your litter pickup or graffiti removal project by September 14 to be eligible to win an early bird prize donated by our generous sponsors.

More information…


Carp Barrens Trail Study

Carp Barrens Trail Study

(Theme 4 – Habitat, Theme 9 – Recreation, Theme10 – Sense of Place)

Organization: Friends of the Carp Hills (FCH)

Project Start Date: 2019

Objective:

The study’s purpose is to provide information about the impact of unauthorized trails constructed for mountain bike use and also used by hikers: should they be closed, moved, made official, limited to seasonal use, etc. A report will identify any trail locations that pose a risk to the ecology of the area, describe the risk or issue, and recommend how it can be mitigated to protect species; e.g. close the trail, modify the trail, move part of the trail, allow seasonal use, etc. This information will be provided to the City of Ottawa for consideration.

The focus of the assessment will be the land around the trails with respect to nesting birds (particularly ground nesters like whip-poor-will and common nighthawk), turtles (basking and nesting areas), rare plants, and any other habitat issues.

More information…


Stillwater Creek Wetland Restoration Project

Stillwater Creek Wetland Restoration Project

(Theme 4 – Habitat, Theme10 – Sense of Place)

Organization: National Capital Commission (NCC) and Rideau Valley Conservation Authority (RVCA)

Timeline for Completion: Started 2018 Ongoing

Objective:

A wetland restoration project in the heart of Ottawa’s Greenbelt has led to an explosion of biodiversity.

Birds such as mallards, killdeer and red-winged blackbirds have returned to the area off Corkstown Road and Moodie Drive after one season of restoration work.

Fish and amphibians are also increasing in number and making the wetland home again.

“I get really excited to see who has moved in, and who is using certain habitat types,” said Rideau Valley Conservation Authority (RVCA) aquatic biologist Jennifer Lamoureux, who designed the wetland’s features.

Now, the restored wetland areas have been reconnected to the groundwater system and feature three large, permanent ponds of varying depths, with logs and branches for fish and wildlife habitat and a range of native wetland plants.

More information…