Home

Next Council Meeting

You are welcome to attend our next Council meeting on:

Wednesday, September 14, 2016, 6PM

Hintonburg Community Centre

Will see you there! 

What is the Ottawa Biosphere Eco-City Initiative (OBEC)?

OBEC is a not-for-profit that uses Biosphere Eco-City (BEC) Themes and Tools to engage people and organizations in sustainability

BEC tool 1 - Council of Stakeholders

Stakeholders meet as a Council to do four main things:

Read more

BEC tool 2 - Demonstration Projects

These are projects that opened up to the public to demonstrate useful approaches to sustainability in a Biosphere Eco-City (BEC).

Read more

BEC tool 3 - Sustainability Plans

This is a short document that provides individuals with ideas on what they can do to advance sustainability.

Read more

BEC tool 4 - Database of Projects

The Database summarizes information projects related to the ten BEC Themes of Sustainability. This is a key tool for sharing information.

Read more

Recent Projects

Information Management

All BEC Tools promote sharing of sustainability information, but OBEC wants to do more.

Join the team

School Sustainability Planning

OBEC has developed material to train high school students to lead the creation of sustainability plans at their schools.

Join the project

Sustain Your Community

OBEC is supporting Envirocentre initiative to engage communities in transportation, energy, food and water conservation projects.

Join the project

Latest Entries in Database of Sustainability Projects

Somerset Street Depaving – Sandy Hill Tree Group

Somerset Street Depaving – Sandy Hill Tree Group

(Theme 4 - Habitat, Theme10 - Sense of Place) Organization: Action Sandy Hill Project [...]
Ray of Light - New Large Scale Solar Initiative

Ray of Light - New Large Scale Solar Initiative

(Theme 2 - Energy) Organization: Energy Ottawa and partner City of Ottawa Project Star[...]
Vegetation Management Project - Mud Lake

Vegetation Management Project - Mud Lake

(Theme 4 - Habitat) Organization: National Capital Commission (NCC) Timeline for Compl[...]
WM Ottawa Residential Recycling Center

WM Ottawa Residential Recycling Center

(Theme 7 - Waste) Organization: Waste Management – West Carleton Environmental Centre [...]
Landfill Gas to Energy

Landfill Gas to Energy

(Theme 2 - Energy, Theme 7 - Waste) Organization: Waste Management of Canada Corporation [...]

I will be presenting at this event Wednesday August 3rd at 1705 Orleans Blvd at the Orleans Public Library. Come join us! ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

OBEC at the Eco District environment day, on the sunny side of a cool day. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Come out to this important event next week to learn about one Inuit community's fight against dirty oil exploration in their waters - and how they're taking their case all the way to the supreme court! Find out how you can get involved and support their campaign. ... See MoreSee Less

Clyde River #SolarNotSeismics: Campaign Presentation

July 21, 2016, 7:00pm - July 21, 2016, 7:30pm

170 Booth St, Ottawa, ON K1R 7W1, Canada

People in the coastal town of Clyde River, Nunavut — one of the most remote communities in the world — are protesting dangerous oil exploration in their waters. A five-year oil exploration project in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait (off Clyde River’s coast) has been approved by the National Energy Board (NEB) without Inuit consent. This project allows seismic blasting — a process of firing loud sonic explosions through the ocean to find oil — as a first step towards dangerous Arctic oil drilling. Clyde River has teamed up with Greenpeace Canada to take action to prevent seismic blasting by filing a legal case against the seismic companies, NEB, and the federal government for failure to consult. The Supreme Court of Canada has now agreed to hear their case. The stakes in this case are really high: if the court rules in Clyde River’s favour, it will set a supreme and total precedent for oil and gas projects across Canada. This case will decide what Indigenous consent to proposed energy projects looks like, hopefully shaping the future of energy development in Canada and beyond for the better. Greenpeace Arctic campaigner Alex Speers-Roesch will be joining us for this event. Come out to learn more about Clyde River, their struggle against seismic blasting and the importance of their upcoming Supreme Court hearing! Background Information: As Arctic ice retreats due to climate change, the people who call this region home are under threat from oil companies that want to exploit the Arctic for all it’s worth. Seismic blasting involves firing extremely loud underwater airguns every ten seconds for weeks on end, and poses a clear threat to Arctic wildlife and the Inuit communities that depend on that wildlife for their food, livelihoods and culture. Seismic blasting is a precursor to Arctic oil drilling, which is not only highly risky, it is also incomisserate with climate targets. If we’re going to make good on the commitments that all countries made in Paris, then we have to leave Arctic oil in the ground. Alternatives already exist, and Clyde River is showing the world that another way is possible. Now, one community is fighting back. The Inuit community of Clyde River is inspiring people around the world by fighting to protect their home, their culture, and the animals they love from the impacts of oil exploitation. This tiny community of 1,100 people is all that stands in the way of a multi-billion dollar industry that wants to blast the melting Arctic in search of oil. By joining forces, Clyde River Inuit, Greenpeace, and the global movement to save the Arctic have successfully stopped seismic blasting for the past two years, and together we will ensure dangerous seismic blasting is never permitted in these fragile Arctic waters This November, Clyde River is taking its fight all the way to the supreme court. If they win, this will have profound implications not just across Canada, but globally. It will show that the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples has teeth. It will change the face of how oil extraction projects are (or are not) approved. And it will reverse the decision to allow dangerous seismic blasting in the waters between Greenland and Canada. But until the case is heard, they aren’t sitting by and waiting for a verdict — they’re continuing to resist seismic blasting by actively demonstrating that clean energy solutions already exist, and that oil and gas development is not the only way forward for the Arctic. This summer, Greenpeace will be standing alongside them. We are traveling to Clyde River aboard the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise to help one of the northernmost communities in the world go solar.

View on Facebook